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Published on
June 23, 2020
Written By
Elise Brown
Digital Content Consultant

TED Radio Hour by Guy Raz

We sometimes complain about the advancement of technology within our lives. It’s always there: reminding us what we missed on our to-do list or notifying who ‘likes’ us (if pressing ‘heart’ is enough to infer that). But not everything is grim; on the contrary, some of the new digital platforms have improved our lives. To focus on one example, podcasts have given us back, although differently, the magic of storytelling. A powerful narrative that’s united humanity since the beginning. In this post, we discuss TED Radio Hour, which ponders a wide variety of themes, that revolve around human curiosities, concerns and wonders. It’s like a modern encyclopedia except it has heart, wit and incorporates experiences that we can all relate to.

This production, co-created between National Public Radio (NPR) and TED, presents itself as ‘a radio show about big ideas’. It’s led by Guy Raz, a journalist, correspondent and radio host (or should we say podcast superstar?). Besides TED Radio Hour, you can also listen to him in How I Built This and Wow in the World, great recommendations if you want to broaden your options.

If you’re new to the podcast world, TED Radio Hour is a wonderful start. And if you aren’t, but you’re seeking to gain a wider perspective on issues that have kept humanity startled, it’s an admirable pool of knowledge. With 150 episodes, you will definitely feel like a kid in a toy store when trying to choose the first one.

So what makes this podcast so special? How is it different from the famous TED Talks?

Raz tries to crumble each theme to understand them better, while giving us the opportunity to analyse them in new, unexpected ways. With the help of TED speakers (usually four) from a diverse array of fields, each topic is observed and questioned from different lenses. For instance in ‘How We Love’, we hear from Amy Webb on how she broke the dating algorithm to find her perfect partner. To Jeffrey Kluger on the fraternal bond and Angela Patton’s experience on how a group of girls decided to take their dance to prison to unite some of their friends with their fathers.

Fifty minutes that transform into a 360º view that allows the audience to gain valuable insight on themes such as: ‘The Meaning of Work’, ‘Why We Lie’  or ‘Building Humane Cities’. It seems as if nothing is left out and our imagination can dance freely upon anything that interests us. But we warn you: this treat for your curious mind is catch-22 because you’ll end up with a thirst for more and your questions will multiply and seethe. But luckily, as each episode binds different TED speakers around a topic, you can pursue your own research, taking whichever paths intrigue you most.

What’s more, many of the podcasts will give you advice and tools to implement in your own life. On ‘Luck, Fortune, and Chance’, Tina Seeling encourages us to take daily, small risks to catch ‘the winds of luck’, as she calls it. Or in ‘Simply Happy’ they talk on the importance of being grateful, cherishing the moment and slowing down.

So yes, technology is all around us and it can be overwhelming, but we do have the power to choose how we want to engage. Podcasts, that have bred from radio and journalism, are here to transform your commute to work or school into an hour where you can learn and open your mind to new ideas. And TED Radio Hour is one of the best options; each episode seeks to inspire and invite you to reflect upon what’s important, for you and humanity. Suddenly commuting doesn’t sound so terrible, right?

2019
Podcast
Image of Elise, TEDx Melbourne writer
Written By
Elise Brown
Digital Content Consultant

Content and Campaign Consultant based in Melbourne. Specialising in making the complex simple. Currently working in financial services.

Image of Elise, TEDx Melbourne writer
Written By
Elise Brown
Digital Content Consultant

Content and Campaign Consultant based in Melbourne. Specialising in making the complex simple. Currently working in financial services.